Three R’s for Getting God to Answer Your Prayers

Praying Through the Bible #42 | with Daniel Whyte III

TEXT: Psalm 4:1

We are in a series of messages titled “Praying Through the Bible: A Series on Every Passage and Verse Regarding Prayer in the Bible”. The purpose of this series is to encourage and motivate you to pray to the God of the Bible. We highlighted each of these over 500 verses and passages in the new Prayer Motivator Devotional Bible. So far, we have done 41 messages in this series.

This is message #42 titled “Three R’s for Getting a Reply from God”.

This psalm, which was written, by David is actually lyrics intended to be put to music. According to The Treasury of David, by Charles H. Spurgeon, the term “On Neginoth” means “on stringed instruments, or hand instruments, such as harps and cymbals. The joy of the Jewish church was so great that they needed music to set forth the delightful feelings of their souls.” (By the way, 179 years ago today, Charles Spurgeon was born. And we thank God for the wonderful life that he lived and the great blessings that he left behind for the body of Christ.)

Today, we will focus our attention on verse one of the psalm where David is making a request of God. And from this single verse, we learn three key elements that we can apply to our own prayers when we are making a request from God. Arthur W. Pink said, “God’s thoughts are not as ours. God requires that His gifts should be sought for. He designs to be honored by our asking.” There is nothing wrong with making a request for something that you need or something that you want. In fact, Jesus Christ commands us to do it. With that in mind, let’s look at how we can make our requests to God in a biblical fashion.

1. First of all, when we are making a request of God, we must realize our dependency on Him.

2. When we are making a request of God, we must remember our past deliverance from Him.

3. When we are making a request of God, we must rely on His mercy and grace for the answer.

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